THE INAUGURAL OXFORD AND CAMBRIDGE SOCIETY (UAE) MAY BALL

As part of an initiative to enable members of Oxbridge Societies internationally, we have been kindly invited to the inaugural Oxford and Cambridge Society, UAE May Ball!  Please see below for details.

DATE:  1st May 2015

TIME:  8.00pm – 1.00am

VENUE:  British Embassy Dubai

Tickets:  500 AED per person

Printable details available here.

HONG KONG OXBRIDGE SOCIETY ANNUAL BOAT RACE DINNER

The Oxford and Cambridge Society, Singapore, is excited to announce that the Oxford and Cambridge Society, HK has extended its invitations to Singapore Society members.

Please see attached the 2015.04.25 boat race dinner form.

Saturday, 25th April 2015, 6:30pm for 8:00pm Dinner

The Hong Kong Club
1 Jackson Road, Central

Members and their guests are cordially invited to our annual Boat Race Dinner on Saturday, 25th April at the Hong Kong Club. Cocktails will be served from 6:30pm and there will be an opportunity for all guests to watch the 2015 University Boat Race. Please come early to enjoy the fun!

The Annual General Meeting of the Society will take place at 6:30pm, just before dinner at 8:00pm.

The cost of the Boat Race Dinner is HK$780 per person for members and HK$900 for guests to include cocktails and a sumptuous four course dinner with wines.

Dress code: black tie

Enquiries: Felix Lai (felix.lai@cantab.net;tel.: 9326 3936), or

Irene Lee (society@oxbridge.org.hk)

BNY Mellon and Newton Investment Management Oxford & Cambridge Boat Race

Date:  11 April 2015 (Saturday)

Support your alumni who are planning to crush their way to victory in Singapore’s very own version in honour of this annual tradition and SG50!

Come cycle along the river, or enjoy the carnival from under Sheares Bridge.

Timeline of Events:

1500 – Oxford v Cambridge (mixed crews)

1600 – Oxbridge v EASTer Rowing Club

1700 – Oxford v Cambridge (Women)

1800 – Oxford v Cambridge (Men)

1830 – Awards Ceremony & Winning Time Prizes

Further Entertainment:

There will be finger food, ice-cream, candy floss & cold drinks.  For the adventurous, a bouncy castle will be available!

Guess the winning times – win bottles of Bollinger!

Relax in our Air-con Lounge and Coffee Corner, and to live bands.

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LOCATION:  11 Rhu Cross, 437440

For a map and printable timeline of events, please click here:  Boat Race flyer

February Fireside with Donald Low: Is the Singapore governance model relevant to other countries?

Date: 10 February 2015

Venue: The Pyramid Club, 2 Goodwood Hill, Singapore 258897

Time: 7 pm – dinner and drinks / 7.30 pm to commence chat

Cost: $20 per Member on a cost recovery basis.


Members may bring one non-Member guest at a cost of $40 per guest.

New Membership or renewal of Membership may be obtained at the event. Kindly contact events@oxbridge.org.sg to verify your membership status, if necessary.

Get your tickets here.

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Speaker Background


Mr Donald Low is Associate Dean (Research and Executive Education) at the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy. Besides leading the School’s executive education efforts, he also heads its case study unit. His research interests at the School include inequality and social spending, behavioural economics, economics and public policy, public finance, and governance and politics in Singapore.

Prior to his current appointment, Donald served fifteen years in the Singapore government. During that time, he established the Centre for Public Economics at the Civil Service College of Singapore to advance economics literacy in the Singapore government.

Donald is the editor of Behavioural Economics and Policy Design: Examples from Singapore (2011), a pioneering book which details how the Singapore government has applied ideas from behavioural economics alongside standard economics in the design of public policies. His most recent book, Hard Choices: Challenging the Singapore Consensus (2014), raises searching questions about the long-term viability of many aspects of governance in Singapore, and argues that a far-reaching and radical rethinking of the country’s policies and institutions is necessary, even if it weakens the very consensus that enabled Singapore to succeed in its first 50 years.

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Tickets available here.